Sunday, November 2, 2008

Indian Earwig Species

Click on the images to zoom.


All the images in this blog are copyrighted. You are free to use these images for non-commercial purposes, such as desktop wallpapers, etc. For commercial use contact us at deadmanswill@gmail.com.

Photographer: deadmanswill

Insect Scout: deadmanswill

Location: Miryalaguda, AP, India

Species Identifier(s): Suunto (http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/919217/)

Points to appreciate:
  • Notice its leathery skin.
  • The two appendages on its rear are called cerci. They are used as forceps by this insect.
  • Check out earwig nymph here and here.

Wikipedia Notes:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earwig
  • Earwig is the common name given to the insect order Dermaptera characterized by membranous wings folded underneath short leathery forewings. The abdomen extends well beyond the wings, and frequently, though not always, ends in a pair of forceps-like structures termed cerci.
  • The forceps is used for a variety of purposes. In some species, the forceps has also been observed in use for holding prey, and in copulation. The forceps tends to be more curved in males than in females.
  • Earwigs are quite common globally. Earwigs are generally nocturnal and can be seen patrolling household walls and ceilings. Earwigs are also drawn to damp conditions. Earwigs tend to gather in shady cracks or openings or anywhere that they can remain concealed in daylight hours.
  • Most earwigs are elongated, flattened, and are dark brown. Lengths are mostly in the quarter- to half-inch range (10–14 mm), with the St. Helena earwig reaching three inches (80 mm).
  • Flight capability in Dermaptera is varied, as there are species with and without wings. Most species of winged earwigs are capable of flight, yet earwigs rarely fly around.
  • This species feeds on other insects, plants, ripe fruit, and garbage. Earwigs can be considered in some ways a beneficial part of the garden, especially when they prey on other insects, but they can become a nuisance because of their habit of positioning themselves within leaves and feeding on soft plant tissues.

Friday, October 24, 2008

Eressa Moth

Click on the images to zoom.


All the images in this blog are copyrighted. You are free to use these images for non-commercial purposes, such as desktop wallpapers, etc. For commercial use contact us at deadmanswill@gmail.com.

Photographer: deadmanswill

Insect Scout: deadmanswill

Location: Miryalaguda, AP, India

Species Identifier(s): claypa, suunto (http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/912378/)

Points to appreciate:
  • Observe the orange bands on the body of the moth. It is a predatory deterrent making the moth appear like a bee or a wasp.
  • This is the reason they are commonly called wasp moths.

Wikipedia Notes:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arctiidae
  • Eressa moths belong to the family Arctiidae.
  • Arctiidae is a large and diverse family of moths with around 11,000 species found all over the world.
  • The most distinctive feature of the family is a tymbal organ on the metathorax. This organ has membranes which are vibrated to produce ultrasonic sounds.
  • They also have thoracic tympanal organs for hearing.
  • The sounds are used in mating and defense against predators.
  • The insects advertise these defenses with aposematic bright coloration, unusual postures, odours, or, in adults, ultrasonic vibrations. Some mimic moths that are poisonous, or wasps that sting like the ones above.

Saturday, October 11, 2008

Darkling Beetle - Tenebrionidae

Click on the images to zoom.



All the images in this blog are copyrighted. You are free to use these images for non-commercial purposes, such as desktop wallpapers, etc. For commercial use contact us at deadmanswill@gmail.com.

Photographer: deadmanswill

Insect Scout: Nanda

Location: Avantipuram, AP, India

Species Identifier(s): suunto (http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/910704/)

Points to appreciate:
  • Observe the finely segemented antennae of the beetle. If you count the segments, you will find there are 11 of them.
  • Also notice the vertical ridge running down the center of the lower body segment. The hard shell-like covering is a actually modified forewings called elytra. In some insects it acts as a protection for the hindwings while in some cases the elytra are fused together and the insect becomes flightless.
Wikipedia Notes:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darkling_beetle


Darkling beetles (also known as Darkening beetles) are a family of beetles found worldwide, estimated at more than 20,000 species. This family of beetles may be identified by a combination of features, including :
  • An 11-segmented antenna which may be filiform, moniliform, or weakly clubbed.
  • First abdominal sternite entire and not divided by the hind coxae.
  • Eyes notched by a frontal ridge.
  • Tarsi have four segments in the hind pair and 5 in the fore and mid legs. The tarsal claws are simple.

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

Syrphid Fly

Click on the images to zoom.


All the images in this blog are copyrighted. You are free to use these images for non-commercial purposes, such as desktop wallpapers, etc. For commercial use contact us at deadmanswill@gmail.com.

Photographer: deadmanswill

Insect Scout: deadmanswill

Location: Miryalaguda, AP, India

Species Identifier(s): pford1854, wallaby1 (http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/906701/)

Points to appreciate:
  • Observe its thicker and stronger hindlegs. This is the reason this insect is also called Thick-legged Hoverfly.
  • Also observe the yellow and black stripes on its body. This insect mimics the appearance of bees and wasps to deceive predators.

Wikipedia Notes:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syrphid_fly
  • Syritta pipiens is a very common species of European hover fly. Sometimes called the Thick-legged Hoverfly, from its distinctive broad hind femora.
  • As their common names suggest, they are often seen hovering or nectaring at flowers; the adults of many species feed mainly on nectar and pollen, while the larvae (maggots) eat a wide range of foods.
  • Because aphids cause tens of millions of dollars of damage to crops worldwide every year, aphid-feeding hoverflies are being recognized as important natural enemies of pests, and potential agents for use in biological control.
  • Some adult syrphid flies are important pollinators.
  • About 6,000 species in 200 genera have been described.
  • Hoverflies are common throughout the world and can be found on every continent except Antarctica.

Monday, September 29, 2008

Tawny Coster Caterpillar eating away (video)!

video

Look at this short video of the caterpillar eating a whole leaf in just a few seconds. Later it moves about and makes some sharp movements with its head reared like a snake, probably a defensive behavior.

Saturday, September 27, 2008

Tawny Coster Caterpillar

Click on the images to zoom.




All the images in this blog are copyrighted. You are free to use these images for non-commercial purposes, such as desktop wallpapers, etc. For commercial use contact us at deadmanswill@gmail.com.

Photographer: deadmanswill

Insect Scout: deadmanswill

Location: Miryalaguda, AP, India

Species Identifier(s): wallaby1 (http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/906963/)

Points to appreciate:
  • Notice the fine spikes on its body are further branching off even finer needles. These are its predatory deterrents.
  • The bright color is probably is a warning of its toxins.
Tomorrow I will post a short video of this caterpillar.

Wikipedia Notes:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acraea_violae
  • The butterfly breeds on plants of the family Loganiaceae and species of Passiflora many of which contain toxins that are sequestered by the caterpillars.
  • This is a butterfly of the hills as well as the plains. It is plentiful in the pre-monsoon and monsoon period and becomes scarce later on.
  • It belongs to the Nymphalidae or brush-footed butterfly family.

Thursday, September 25, 2008

Lemon Pansy Butterfly

Click on the images to zoom.

All the images in this blog are copyrighted. You are free to use these images for non-commercial purposes, such as desktop wallpapers, etc. For commercial use contact us at deadmanswill@gmail.com.

Photographer: Neelima

Insect Scout: Neelima

Location: Miryalaguda, AP, India

Species Identifier(s): Wallby1 (http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/901966/)

Points to appreciate:
  • Observe the dark eye-like spots on its wing. They probably are predatory deterrents.
  • Also notice the dark color of its wing. During the dry season the colors go pale so that the butterfly can camouflage itself by appearing like a dry leaf.
  • Observe how even its eyes and body are similarly brown in color.
Wikipedia Notes:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Junonia_lemonias
  • Its scientific name is Junonia lemonias. It belongs to the family Nymphalidae.
  • These species are common to South Asia.
  • It is found in gardens, fallow land, and open wooded areas.
  • The wet and dry season forms differ considerably in coloration and even shape.
  • In the wet season form the markings are distinct and vivid and the wing shape is a little more rounded.
  • In the dry season form the markings are obscure and pale especially on the underside and the wing margin is more angular and jagged. This helps it camouflage in the dried leaf-litter.
  • The Lemon pansy is a very active butterfly and can be seen basking with its wings open facing the sun.
  • It sits very low to the ground and can be approached easily.

Wednesday, September 24, 2008

Tawny Coster Butterfly

Click on the images to zoom.

All the images in this blog are copyrighted. You are free to use these images for non-commercial purposes, such as desktop wallpapers, etc. For commercial use contact us at deadmanswill@gmail.com.

Photographer: Neelima

Insect Scout: Neelima

Location: Miryalaguda, AP, India

Species Identifier(s): Wallby1 (http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/901966/)

Points to appreciate:
  • Observe its leathery wings. This insect has a weak flight.
  • This insect is a slow flyer and yet is avoided by most predators.
  • The reason is this insect gives out a smelly oily substance that is distasteful for most insect eaters.
I will post the catterpillar of this species tommorrow.

Wikipedia Notes:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acraea_violae
  • The scientific name of this specie is Acraea terpsicore
  • This belongs to the Nymphalidae or brush-footed butterfly family.
  • The butterfly is found in India and Sri Lanka. It si common all the year round and is equally at home in forest clearings and in open country.
  • Though mainly seen at low elevations it has been recorded at heights of up to 7000 feet in south India and sometimes in the North.
  • The butterfly breeds on plants of the family Loganiaceae and species of Passiflora many of which contain toxins that are sequestered by the caterpillars.

Thursday, September 18, 2008

Lime Blue Butterfly

Click on the images to zoom.



All the images in this blog are copyrighted. You are free to use these images for non-commercial purposes, such as desktop wallpapers, etc. For commercial use contact us at deadmanswill@gmail.com.

Photographer: deadmanswill

Insect Scout: deadmanswill

Location: Miryalaguda, AP, India

Species Identifier(s): Wallby1 (http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/901966/)

Points to appreciate:
  • The butterfly in the image is male.
  • There are two kinds of Lime Blue butterflies: Wet Season Brood and Dry Season Brood.
  • Observe the mouthparts of the insect. See how it is crafted for sucking nectar. (Click on the images to see larger sizes).
  • All butterfly wings are coated with minute scales that make up the unique design of the wings on each species.
Wikipedia Notes:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilades_laius
  • The Lime Blue (Chilades laius) is a small butterfly found in India that belongs to the Lycaenids or Blues family.
  • Male has a bluish-purple upperside.

Saturday, September 13, 2008

Plain Tiger Butterfly

Click on the images to zoom


All the images in this blog are copyrighted. You are free to use these images for non-commercial purposes, such as desktop wallpapers, etc. For commercial use contact us at deadmanswill@gmail.com.

Photographer: deadmanswill, Neelima

Insect Scout: deadmanswill, Neelima

Location: Miryalaguda, AP, India

Species Identifier(s): Wallby1 (http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/901966/)

Points to appreciate:
  • Observe the white polka dots all over its body. It is very characteristic of this species.
  • The wings of all butterflies are covered with minute scales that give the unique design to each species.
Wikipedia Notes:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danaus_chrysippus
  • The Plain Tiger (Danaus chrysippus) or - outside Asia - African Monarch is a common butterfly which is widespread in Asia and Africa. It belongs to the danaine ("Crows and Tigers") subfamily of the brushfooted butterfly family Nymphalidae.
  • It is believed to be one of the first butterflies to be used in art. A 3500 year old Egyptian fresco in Luxor features the oldest illustration of this species.
  • The Plain Tiger can be considered the archetypical danaine of India.
  • The Plain Tiger is a medium sized butterfly with a wingspan of about 7–8 cm. The body is black with many white spots.
  • The male Plain Tiger is smaller than the female, but more brightly colored.
  • The range of the Plain Tiger extends from Africa and southern Europe, eastwards via Sri Lanka, India, and Myanmar to China and Sulawesi. It is a very common species.
  • The Plain Tiger is protected from attacks due to the unpalatable alkaloids ingested during the larval stages. The butterfly therefore flies slowly and leisurely, generally close to the ground and in a straight line. This gives a would-be predator ample time to recognise and avoid attacking it. Inexperienced predators will try attacking it, but will learn soon enough to avoid this butterfly as the alkoloids in its body cause vomiting.

Wednesday, September 10, 2008

Red Velvet Mite

Click on the images to zoom.



All the images in this blog are copyrighted. You are free to use these images for non-commercial purposes, such as desktop wallpapers, etc. For commercial use contact us at deadmanswill@gmail.com.

Photographer: deadmanswill, Nanda Gopal

Insect Scout: deadmanswill

Location: Hyderabad, AP, India

Species Identifier(s): Wallby1 (http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/901373/)

Points to appreciate:
  • This is a mite. Mites are not insects, scientifically speaking.
  • Observe its legs. Notice that two pairs are located in its thorax area while two more pairs are seen near the mouth parts. Insects have legs coming only out of their thorax.
Notes:
  • Mites belong to the class Arachnida under which spiders fall too.
  • They are one of the most successful invertebrates.
  • Most mites are microscopic.
  • There are over 32,000 described species.
  • As larvae they attach themselves to other insects and thrive by sucking blood. After becoming an adult they live on the forest floor feeding on other smaller insects and insect eggs.

Monday, September 8, 2008

Jumping Spider - Salticidae

Click on the images to zoom.



All the images in this blog are copyrighted. You are free to use these images for non-commercial purposes, such as desktop wallpapers, etc. For commercial use contact us at deadmanswill@gmail.com.

Photographer: deadmanswill

Insect Scout: deadmanswill

Location: Avantipuram, AP, India

Species Identifier(s):
Wallby1 (http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/900949/)


Points to appreciate:
  • Observe the layout of its eyes. These spiders have eight eyes and four are arranged in a neat row towards the front.
  • These spiders move around by jumping and are secured by a silk tether. The concept of spiderman sprung from them.
  • The two limbs in the front are called palps (or pedipalps). They aid in ingesting the food into the mouth.
  • The hairs on their limbs are sensitive and function in place of sensitive antennae.
  • This species was about 1 cm in length.
Notes:
  • Jumping spiders are the largest spider family with about 5000 described species.
  • They are well known for their good vision and inquisitiveness.
  • They usually disguise themselves by mimicking other insects like beetles, ants, etc. Some are camouflaged to appear like parts of twigs, leaves, rock or sand.
  • They can jump nearly 50 times their body length. Some are know to jump even greater distances. This is possible because jumping spiders have an internal hydraulic system in their legs that enables them to change their blood pressure and use it to gain leverage while jumping.

Sunday, September 7, 2008

Leaf Beetles Mating






Click on the images to zoom.

All the images in this blog are copyrighted. You are free to use these images for non-commercial purposes, such as desktop wallpapers, etc. For commercial use contact us at deadmanswill@gmail.com.

Anybody interested in learning the mating process of leaf beetles can watch these sequence of images. Observe the small appendage coming out of the abdomen of the smaller beetle on the top and the same being inserted into the larger ones abdomen.

Saturday, September 6, 2008

Leaf Beetles - Hispinae

Click on the images to zoom.


All the images in this blog are copyrighted. You are free to use these images for non-commercial purposes, such as desktop wallpapers, etc. For commercial use contact us at deadmanswill@gmail.com.

Photographer: deadmanswill

Insect Scout: deadmanswill

Location: Hyderabad, AP, India

Species Identifier(s): Sunnto (http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/900269/)

Points to appreciate:
  • This pair belongs to the family of Leaf Beetles (Chrysomelidae) and to the sub family Hispinae.
  • We think the male the smaller one on top but we are not sure.
  • Can you make out the eyes of these creatures?
Notes from Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chrysomelidae
  • Beetles in the family Chrysomelidae are commonly known as leaf beetles.
  • This is a family of over 35,000 species in more than 2,500 genera, one of the largest and most commonly-encountered of all beetle families.
  • Adult and larval leaf beetles feed on all sorts of plant tissue. Many are economically important pests of agriculture, for example the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), the asparagus beetle (Crioceris asparagi), the cereal leaf beetle (Oulema melanopus), and various flea beetles.

Thursday, September 4, 2008

Shell-less Snail (Slug)

Click on the images to zoom.



All the images in this blog are copyrighted. You are free to use these images for non-commercial purposes, such as desktop wallpapers, etc. For commercial use contact us at deadmanswill@gmail.com.

Photographer: deadmanswill

Insect Scout: Geetha Pallavi

Location: Miryalaguda, AP, India

Species Identifier(s): Wallaby1, kennedyh (http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/898824/)

Points to appreciate:
  • Scientifically this is not an insect but a mollusk. Snails, oyesters, mussels, squids, octopuses, scallops, clams are some other examples of mollusks.
  • Shell-less snails are more usual in the sea and they are more exotic in their appearance as well.
  • The above animal is a nocturnal creature, that is, they are active during the night. We found it under a brick and as soon as we removed the brick it shuffled off to hide itself under dark leaves and sleep.
  • This could be a Tropical Leatherleaf slug but we are not sure. If it is a Tropical Leatherleaf, then it has a pallial lung and can breathe air.
Notes from Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slug
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tropical_leatherleaf

  • Land slugs, like all other gastropods, undergo torsion (a 180ยบ twisting of the internal organs) during development. Internally the anatomy of a slug clearly shows the effects of this rotation, but externally the bodies of slugs appear rather symmetrical.
  • The soft, slimy bodies of slugs are prone to desiccation (extreme dryness), so land-living slugs are confined to moist environments and are forced to retreat to damp hiding places when the weather is dry.
  • Like other snails, slugs macerate food using their radula, a rough, tongue-like organ with many tiny tooth-like denticles.
  • Like other pulmonate land snails, most slugs have two pairs of 'feelers' or tentacles on their head; the upper pair being light sensors, while the lower pair provides the sense of smell. Both pairs are retractable and can be regrown if lost.
  • Most slugs are harmless to humans and their interests, but a small number of species of slugs are pests of agriculture and horticulture. They feed on fruits and vegetables prior to harvest, making holes in the crop, which can make individual items unsuitable to sell for aesthetic reasons and which can make the crop more vulnerable to rot and disease.

Wednesday, September 3, 2008

Non-biting Midge - Chironomidae

Click on the images to zoom.




All the images in this blog are copyrighted. You are free to use these images for non-commercial purposes, such as desktop wallpapers, etc. For commercial use contact us at deadmanswill@gmail.com.

Photographer: deadmanswill

Insect Scout: Nanda Gopal

Location: Avantipuram, AP, India

Species Identifier(s): Matthew, Debbie Hadley (http://insects.about.com/)

This is a correction of this post. We were mistaken in identifying this insect as a crane fly and were corrected by one of our readers, Matthew. Matthew informed us this insect was a non-biting midge. A consultation with experts on this forum also proved this.

Points to appreciate:
  • Though these insects resemble mosquitoes, they differ in various respects. They do not have sucking mouthparts as mosquitoes do. Also their wings lack scales.
  • The males (as this one above certainly is) have a feathery (plumose) antennae. They use these antennae to sense sex pheromones let out into the air by the females to attract a mate. Pheromones are chemicals insects produce for various communication purposes.
  • Midges are also identified by their hunchbacks. You can observe this easily in the third image (click on it enlarge the image).
Notes from Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chironomidae

Chironomidae (informally known as chironomids or non-biting midges) are a family of nematoceran flies with a global distribution. They are closely related to the Ceratopogonidae, Simuliidae, and Thaumaleidae. Many species superficially resemble mosquitoes but they lack the wing scales and elongate mouthparts of the Culicidae. This is a large group of insects with over 5000 described species and 700 species in North America alone. Males are easily recognized by their plumose antennae

Read this useful article to learn more how to identify midges and crane flies.

Tuesday, September 2, 2008

Lynx Spider - Oxyopes

Click on the images to zoom.















All the images in this blog are copyrighted. You are free to use these images for non-commercial purposes, such as desktop wallpapers, etc. For commercial use contact us at deadmanswill@gmail.com.

Photographer: deadmanswill

Insect Scout: deadmanswill

Location: Miryalaguda, AP, India

Species Identifier(s): Debbie Hadley (http://insects.about.com/)

Points to appreciate:
  • Observe its mouthparts. The pair of projections that end in a sort of black beads are called pedipalps.
  • Pedipalps are used for transfer of sperms from the male to the female of the species. This function is unique to spiders.
  • Notice the finely spiked legs of the insect. And the legs are almost transparent.
  • This species appears to be a striped lynx spider, but we are not sure. If you can identify the species, do leave a note in the comment box.
Notes from Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxyopidae
  • Lynx Spiders are hunting spiders that spend their lives on plants, flowers and shrubs. Nimble runners and jumpers, they rely on their keen eyesight to stalk, chase or ambush prey.
  • Six of their eight eyes are arranged in a hexagon-like pattern, a characteristic that identifies them as members of the family Oxyopidae. They also have spiny legs.
  • Some members of the genus Oxyopes are abundant enough to be important in agricultural systems as biological control agents. This is especially true of the striped lynx spider Oxyopes salticus.

Leafhopper

Click on the images to zoom.



All the images in this blog are copyrighted. You are free to use these images for non-commercial purposes, such as desktop wallpapers, etc. For commercial use contact us at deadmanswill@gmail.com.

Photographer: deadmanswill

Insect Scout: deadmanswill

Location: Miryalaguda, AP, India

Species Identifier(s): Wallaby1 (http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/f/bugid/all/)

Points to appreciate:
  • Notice the simple eyes present on the top of the head. (click on images to zoom)
  • They are mostly brightly colored and designed.
Notes:
Insects of family Cicadellidae are commonly called Leafhoppers. They are very small insects that feed on plants through sucking mouthparts and are usually responsible for transmitting bacteria and viruses that infect the plants. These insects are found all over the world and about 20,000 species were described so far. Some species are notorious pests.

Sunday, August 31, 2008

Swallowtail Caterpillar

Click on the images to zoom.


All the images in this blog are copyrighted. You are free to use these images for non-commercial purposes, such as desktop wallpapers, etc. For commercial use contact us at deadmanswill@gmail.com.

Photographer: Neelima

Insect Scout: Neelima

Location
: Miryalaguda, AP, India


Species Ide
ntifier(s): Debbie Hadley (http://insects.about.com/)

Points to appreciate:
  • This is a caterpillar of a Swallowtail butterfly. I will soon post images of the adult butterfly.
  • Notice the eye-like spots on the caterpillar. Some consider them to be predator deterrents, meaning they have these spots to appear menacing to birds and other natural predators.
  • They have, of course, defensive organs too. They have small y-shaped organs called osmeterium on the back of their heads. These organs give off a very foul odor whenever the caterpillars feel threatened. Normally these organs are hidden.
  • I thought this was a Spicebush Swallowtail caterpillar, but then I read Spicebush Swallowtails are only found in Eastern US. If you can identify this Indian species, do leave a note in the comment. We will include your name in the species identifier above.
Notes from Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swallowtail_butterfly
  • Swallowtail butterflies are large, colorful butterflies which form the family Papilionidae. The family includes the largest butterflies in the world.
  • There are at least 550 species, and though the majority are tropical, members of the family are found on all continents except Antarctica.
  • The adults are often tailed like the forked tail of some swallows, giving the insect its name.

Saturday, August 30, 2008

Lantern Fly

Click on the images to zoom.


All the images in this blog are copyrighted. You are free to use these images for non-commercial purposes, such as desktop wallpapers, etc. For commercial use contact us at deadmanswill@gmail.com.

Photographer: deadmanswill, Nanda Gopal

Location: Annavaram, AP, India

Insect Scout: Nanda Gopal

Species Identifier(s): Debbie Hadley (http://insects.about.com/)

Points to appreciate:
  • See how its eyes are almost undifferentiated from its head
  • Single upturned antenna on the head, like a horn. (Click on the second image to zoom on the head)
Notes from Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lantern_fly
  • The family Fulgoridae is a large group of hemipteran insects, especially abundant and diverse in the tropics, containing over 125 genera world-wide. They are mostly of moderate to large size, many with a superficial resemblance to Lepidoptera due to their brilliant and varied coloration. Various genera and species (especially the genera Fulgora and Pyrops) are sometimes referred to as lantern flies, though they do not emit light.
  • The head of some species is produced into a hollow process, resembling a snout, which is sometimes inflated and nearly as large as the body of the insect, sometimes elongated, narrow and apically upturned.